Rattle and Hum

Cat purrs
and katydid calls
happen in the same
rattling rhythm
The inhale
and exhale
of summer

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100 Famous Directors’ Rules of Filmmaking

I love this quote:

Jean-Luc Godard

“A film should have a beginning, a middle, and an end, but not necessarily in that order.”

Flavorwire

Artistic expression is an assertion of individuality, and all artists compose their work differently. In the case of filmmaking, there are numerous approaches to translating a story to celluloid. Inspired by director Wim Wenders’ recent advertising short, “Wim Wenders’ Rules for Cinema Perfection,” we’ve collected the golden rules of filmmaking employed by 100 famous directors. These tips and tricks are a wonderful source of advice and inspiration — even for the most seasoned professionals. The rules also serve as a fascinating snapshot of each directors’ filmography, capturing the spirit of their work.

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My Voice (Yodelay-ee-oo)

My voice.
(Mine.)
Whispers in my ear
expresses through my fingers
wants, by the bend of my knee.
(Mine.)
My voice.
Pushes with its elbow
in the small of my back
when it thinks I’m not listening
(Mine.)
[..Yes.
I am yours
You are me
and mine...]
(MINE.)
My voice.
Struggles to KNOW
strains to feel
hopes, above all
(Mine.)
My voice.
Mine.

Coconut Woman

When I lived on Hawaii I ate
Coconuts
She said
When I lived on Hawaii I ate coconut.
When I lived on Hawaii I watched
Surfers sail
She said
Surfers sailing past the beach.
When I lived on Hawaii I danced
(A lot)
She said
When I lived on Hawaii I danced a lot.

When she cut up a coconut
Just for me
Just for me
She told these stories
when she cut up a coconut
just for me.

 

Ocean Girl

I’m an ocean girl.
Not a river person
(although rivers are fine)
and definitely not a lake person
(lakes don’t go anywhere,
they’re greedy, collecting taxes from streams).
I have to have an ocean nearby
like a security blanket:
I am still here,
your old home.
Everything’s alright.
I need to hear the waves
against the shoreline.
An infant,
craving its mother’s heartbeat.